Fall Internship: Desert Youth Heritage Project

Fall Internship: Desert Youth Heritage Project

Now Recruiting!

In partnership with the National Park Service & Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, and the Santa Cruz Valley National Heritage Area the Desert Youth Heritage Project is recruiting 8 Sonoran Desert interns to explore Place, the Natural World, and Community through exploration, storytelling, and reflection to engage in a process that showcases the diverse, intersectional, and environmental realities of our cultural heritage and wild and urban ecosystems.

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Adventure & Learning:

Adjusting engagement styles to adhere to scientifically-derived Covid-19 protocols, interns get outside and explore urban and wildland ecosystems as a crucial element of their internship experience. Interns will create a tapestry of stories that stitch the experiences of youth from diverse perspectives into a legacy story that spans the Santa Cruz River watershed, from the border of Mexico through Tucson. In addition, this project builds research, ecological, communication, and technical skills that align youth participants to opportunities with community partners, jobs, and academic programs that best relate to their personal interests and values.

  • Rediscover personal heritage and shared history along the Santa Cruz River
  • Explore unique wildland and urban ecosystems from the sky islands to the barrios
  • Develop interpretive stories and resources related to the environmental realities affecting you and your community
  • Apply knowledge and experiences gained in past ITE internships
  • Educate community members on the unique heritage of the Santa Cruz River Valley
  • Apply your knowledge and experience by mentoring new youth environmental stewards
  • Specialize in social and environmental issues affecting the place you call home

Meet last year's DYHP Interns!

CAT – Terra

Terra Gomez

CAT – Terra

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The plants are pretty awesome looking, and the smell of rain is better here >:)”

Malachi

Malachi Fisher

Malachi

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The Santa Cruz River Valley is a vibrant yet desolate desert, it is hot, arid, and dusty, but it is a finely tuned ecosystem that has adapted to these conditions. Humans have taken over this land and put houses over this landscape, wanting to live in a place that doesn’t get very cold. Wars have been waged over this land and many have lost their lives being pushed from this land. A million people have chosen this place as their home and find meaning and value from its mountains and wildlife.”

Andrea

Andrea Casas

Andrea

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“It looks very dry and deserted but once you get to live in it you start to see how fascinating the environment can hold and preserve water even with the high temperatures.”

Isolde Edminster-Genet

Isolde Edminster-Genet

Isolde Edminster-Genet

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“I would describe it as not an oasis in the desert but rather a desert oasis; a strikingly beautiful desert region which encompasses many different biomes and fosters great biodiversity – from squirrels and pines in the mountains, to yucca and gila monsters in the low desert. It is an abundant area which has been home to the Tohono O’odham and Pasqua Yaqui tribes for thousands of years.”

Dot

Dorothy Pallanes

Dot

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The Santa Cruz and the Sonoran desert have been the home and migrating path for the Yaqui, Tohono O’odham and Hohokam people since time immemorial. The ecosystem is unique to the Sonoran desert- we have drought resistant plants like the saguaro and we have water gulping plants like desert cotton wood. the color pallet of this place is a bright baby blue, jade and olive green, and a dark brown and dark purple. the people here are a community of veterans, auto workers, hippies, white liberals, chicano boys and girls, and many an athlete. Everyone has a different story here and they can all be shared over delicious food on any corner of the city.”

Isaiah

Isaiah Haley

Isaiah

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The Santa Cruz River is one of the few most hospitable places in the Sonoran desert.”

YAC – Gianna

Gianna Alvarenga

YAC – Gianna

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“I would describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert as being an ecosystem that looks inhabitable and dead, but actually holds a lot of special value because of the many animals that live there and find food from it.”

IMG_1954

Paloma Martinez

IMG_1954

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“I would warn them and say that at first glance, it might be underwhelming or misjudged. Mostly because of the trash, and because many people expect a “river” to have water flowing. However, I would tell them they better love it because that river has been a big part of my life. It is also the reason Tucson even exists. I would tell them it is one way that animals like the coyote and javelina are able to travel more safely. I would tell them it’s a great place for horseback riding and sand ball wars. I would probably tell them the significance for past generations as well. Some Grandparents in Tucson still remember having boat parties on the river and hanging out after school.”

The Desert Youth Heritage Project is accepting applications for Fall 2021!

Apply here before September 4th, 2021!

This internship is for Youth Action Corps members that have completed a previous ITE Internship Program such as Youth Ambassadors for Southwest Cultures (YASWC) or Nature and Cultures Beyond Borders (NCBB) 

Application: Youth Internship Programs

Ironwood Tree Experience programs seek youth participants who are motivated, adventurous and eager to learn. Depending upon the specific internship program, participant age range may be from 14-20 years. Interns must be available for the dates listed on the internship program schedule to be considered.
  • MM slash DD slash YYYY
  • Please indicate if plan to seek credit for this internship. You must prearrange the credit and reporting requirements with your teacher ahead of time. ITE staff can work with your teacher to facilitate this process.
  • Tell Us About Who You Are

  • Additional Details

  • The interview will take approximately 1/2 hour. Final selection will take place on April 1st (no kidding:)
  • During Covid-19 ITE is not able to transport participants. We require all participants pre arrange transportation in advance of all activity dates in order to arrive on time to various field locations.
  • Acknowledgement and Releases

  • The Acknowledgment and Assumption of Risks and Release and Indemnity Agreement represents a part of Ironwood Tree Experience's (ITE) risk management practices. Please read the entire document carefully. The “Acknowledgement and Assumption of Risks” section explains some of the activities in which you might choose to be engaged by your choice of courses, as well as some of the associated risks, hazards, and dangers you may face. Many ITE courses engage in field activities/trips, exercise-related activities, and some travel to remote wilderness settings and/or engage in training in such skills as rock climbing, various kinds of boating, skiing, yoga, etc. This section contains your acknowledgment, acceptance, and assumption of the risks of those activities, whether or not they are specifically described. We cannot predict every possible scenario; we have simply listed numerous examples. We seek to inform you of the kinds of activities, risks, and possible outcomes you might be facing. If you have questions or concerns, we expect you to contact us. Why do we not promise a safe program? Because a “safe program” would mean not exposing ourselves to any risk. We often expose ourselves to risk by traveling to backcountry settings, exploring nature and even cooking on stoves. These types of activities have inherent risks and are part of some of our programs. Inherent risks are those that are integral to the very nature of the activity. Without the inherent risk, the activity would lose its essential nature. For example the risk of injury from lightning increases as one climbs higher, and it is an inherent risk to being in mountainous environments. While we can make judgments about the risks and consequences, there is no way to guarantee safety. We strive to make good judgments. However, judgment is not infallible. Misjudgment itself is one of the most significant inherent risks. The “Release and Indemnity Agreement” section releases and indemnifies ITE from claims made against ITE. We do not seek this protection with regard to reckless or grossly negligent acts. We do seek protection from ordinary or simple negligence and all inherent or other risks, including misjudgment. We seek this protection because of the litigious climate in our society today. The line between inherent risks and negligence is not clear for all to see. The prospect of frivolous lawsuits, before judges and juries who may or may not understand the risks in the activities in which we participate in, is a real and significant threat to ITE. We are reserving the right to invoke these documents as we see fit. This is the result of circumstances that neither you nor ITE created. If you are uncertain about the meaning or significance of the Acknowledgment and Assumption of Risks & Release and Indemnity Agreement, you should consult an attorney before signing. Our hope is that you have confidence that ITE will strive to manage the risks we face and be fair in deciding our responsibility to you (if any) in the event of an accident or loss. If you do not have this confidence, you should not enroll or do activities at ITE. Please contact the Ironwood Tree Experience office with any questions you might have. Please review this Document carefully before agreeing to terms. All students, volunteers, instructors and guests (hereafter “student(s)”) must agree to the terms in this Document. For students under 18 years of age (hereafter “minor student”), parent or guardian (hereafter “parent”) and the student must agree to terms. ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RISKS Although Ironwood Tree Experience has taken reasonable steps to provide you with appropriate equipment and skilled instructors so you can enjoy an activity for which you may not be skilled, we wish to remind you: field courses are not without risk. Certain risks cannot be eliminated without destroying the unique character of field courses. These are the same elements that contribute to accidental injury or illness, permanent trauma or death. We do not want to frighten you or reduce your enthusiasm for field activities, but we do think it is important for you to know in advance what to expect and to be informed of the inherent risks. Among these are the following: The nature of the activity itself (examples of inherent risks of activities include rock fall for rock climbing; drowning for boating; inclement weather for camping; etc); Misjudgments by self, others, or ITE employees; Acts of other participants, employees and agents of Ironwood Tree Experience, or other persons; in this activity; Latent or apparent defects or conditions in equipment or animals supplied by Ironwood Tree Experience, or other persons or entities; Use or operation, by myself or others, of equipment or animals supplied by Ironwood Tree Experience, or other persons or entities; Weather conditions; Contact with plants or animals; My own physical condition, or my own acts or omissions; Condition of roads, trails, waterways or terrain, and accidents connected with their use; First-aid, emergency treatment, or other services rendered; Consumption of food and drink. I (student and parent(s) of a minor student): Have read and understand the above information and all ITE information received. Have carefully read, reviewed, completed and signed the provided forms and paperwork. I acknowledge that the ITE staff is and has been available, should I have questions about the nature and physical demands of ITE programs and the risks associated with them. Understand that ITE cannot assure the student’s safety or eliminate these risks, and that all students share in the responsibility for their own safety. Understand that the information provided is not complete and that other unknown or unanticipated activities, risks, and outcomes may exist. Represent that I am voluntarily participating, with knowledge of the risks, and can do so without causing harm to myself or others. Assume and accept full responsibility for myself (son/daughter) for the inherent or other risks (both known and unknown) of these courses and for any injury, damage, death, or other loss me resulting from those risks. RELEASE AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENT In consideration of the services of ITE, staff, advisors, board members, teaching assistants, independent contractors, and all other persons or entities associated with it (collectively referred to as “ITE”), student and parent(s) of a minor student, acknowledge and agree as follows for the enrollment in a ITE course. Please read carefully. This Release and Indemnity Agreement contains a surrender of certain legal rights. I (adult students, or parent(s), for themselves, and for and on behalf of their participating minor student, agree as follows): to release and agree not to sue ITE, with respect to all claims, liabilities, suits, or expenses (hereafter “claim or claims”), asserted by or on behalf of me or my minor student, in any way arising from or related to with my, or my minor student’s enrollment or participation in ITE courses or activities, or use of ITE’s equipment or facilities. I understand that in signing this Document, I, my minor student, and anyone acting on my or my minor student’s behalf, surrender our respective rights to make a claim against ITE for any injury, damage, death or other loss suffered by me or my minor student. to defend and indemnify (“indemnify” meaning protect by reimbursement or payment including costs and attorneys fees) ITE, with respect to all claims, brought by or on behalf of me, my minor student, a family member, a co-participant or another party, in any way arising from or related to my, or my minor student’s participation in ITE activities or use of ITE equipment or facilities. This Release and Indemnity Agreement includes any losses caused or alleged to be caused, in whole or in part, by the negligence of PC (but not its gross negligence or reckless misconduct) and includes claims for personal injury, property damage, wrongful death, breach of contract, or otherwise. The following provisions apply to both the Acknowledgement and Assumption of Risks and the Agreement of Indemnity Release: ITE is authorized to obtain or provide emergency medical care, hospitalization, surgical or other medical care for me, or my minor student. I authorize ITE to administer emergency medical care and I understand that non-licensed medical providers may assist in providing such care. I (student and parent(s) of a minor student) agree that Arizona State law (without regard to its conflict of law rules) governs this document, and any dispute I have with ITE and all other aspects of my relationship with ITE, and that any mediation, suit or other proceeding must be filed or entered into only in Pima County, Arizona. I will attempt to settle any dispute through mediation before a mutually acceptable Arizona mediator. To the extent mediation does not result in a resolution the dispute will be submitted to binding arbitration through the American Arbitration Association, in Arizona. I (we) also agree to pay all costs for attorneys’ fees incurred by ITE in defending a claim or suit, if that claim or suit is withdrawn, or to the extent a court or arbitration determines that ITE is not responsible for the injury or loss. Any portion of this Document deemed unlawful or unenforceable shall not affect the enforceability of the remaining provisions and those remaining provisions shall continue in full force and effect.
    By checking the above box, I hereby grant ITE and it’s professional partners (i.e. land agencies & non profit organizations) the right to take photographs and video of me, and to use the finished images in any legitimate uses that ITE or its professional partners deem proper (to the extent befitting the mission of ITE and its professional partners), including publications and websites. Furthermore, I relinquish and give to ITE all right, title and interest I may have in the finished pictures, negatives, reproductions and copies of the original prints, negatives, and videos. I also grant ITE the right to publish and/or release to the media information about myself and the activities I did with ITE or its professional partners. STUDENTS AND PARENTS OF A MINOR PARTICIPANT: I have carefully read, understand and voluntarily agree to this document and understand that I am surrendering certain legal rights. I acknowledge that it shall be effective and binding upon me, my participating minor student and other family members, and my heirs, executors, representatives and estate.