Fall Internship: Desert Youth Heritage Project

Fall Internship: Desert Youth Heritage Project

Now Recruiting!

In partnership with the National Park Service & Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, and the Santa Cruz Valley National Heritage Area the Desert Youth Heritage Project is recruiting 8 Sonoran Desert interns to explore Place, the Natural World, and Community through exploration, storytelling, and reflection to engage in a process that showcases the diverse, intersectional, and environmental realities of our cultural heritage and wild and urban ecosystems.


Adventure & Learning:

Adjusting engagement styles to adhere to scientifically-derived Covid-19 protocols, interns get outside and explore urban and wildland ecosystems as a crucial element of their internship experience. Interns will create a tapestry of stories that stitch the experiences of youth from diverse perspectives into a legacy story that spans the Santa Cruz River watershed, from the border of Mexico through Tucson. In addition, this project builds research, ecological, communication, and technical skills that align youth participants to opportunities with community partners, jobs, and academic programs that best relate to their personal interests and values.

  • Rediscover personal heritage and shared history along the Santa Cruz River
  • Explore unique wildland and urban ecosystems from the sky islands to the barrios
  • Develop interpretive stories and resources related to the environmental realities affecting you and your community
  • Apply knowledge and experiences gained in past ITE internships
  • Educate community members on the unique heritage of the Santa Cruz River Valley
  • Apply your knowledge and experience by mentoring new youth environmental stewards
  • Specialize in social and environmental issues affecting the place you call home
DSC06533
DSC06533

Isolde shares the story of Urban Renewal and Barrio Viejo along the Chuk-son Trail near a sculpture by Luiz Mena

DYHP – SCR2
DYHP – SCR2

DYHP Interns converse along the Santa Cruz River along the Heritage Project reach in downtown Tucson

DYHP – El Tiradito
DYHP – El Tiradito

Dot reflects along the Chuk-son Trail at El Tiradito a National Historic Landmark in Barrio Viejo

Meet last year's DYHP Interns!

CAT – Terra

Terra Gomez

CAT – Terra

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The plants are pretty awesome looking, and the smell of rain is better here >:)”

Malachi

Malachi Fisher

Malachi

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The Santa Cruz River Valley is a vibrant yet desolate desert, it is hot, arid, and dusty, but it is a finely tuned ecosystem that has adapted to these conditions. Humans have taken over this land and put houses over this landscape, wanting to live in a place that doesn’t get very cold. Wars have been waged over this land and many have lost their lives being pushed from this land. A million people have chosen this place as their home and find meaning and value from its mountains and wildlife.”

Andrea

Andrea Casas

Andrea

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“It looks very dry and deserted but once you get to live in it you start to see how fascinating the environment can hold and preserve water even with the high temperatures.”

Isolde Edminster-Genet

Isolde Edminster-Genet

Isolde Edminster-Genet

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“I would describe it as not an oasis in the desert but rather a desert oasis; a strikingly beautiful desert region which encompasses many different biomes and fosters great biodiversity – from squirrels and pines in the mountains, to yucca and gila monsters in the low desert. It is an abundant area which has been home to the Tohono O’odham and Pasqua Yaqui tribes for thousands of years.”

Dot

Dorothy Pallanes

Dot

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The Santa Cruz and the Sonoran desert have been the home and migrating path for the Yaqui, Tohono O’odham and Hohokam people since time immemorial. The ecosystem is unique to the Sonoran desert- we have drought resistant plants like the saguaro and we have water gulping plants like desert cotton wood. the color pallet of this place is a bright baby blue, jade and olive green, and a dark brown and dark purple. the people here are a community of veterans, auto workers, hippies, white liberals, chicano boys and girls, and many an athlete. Everyone has a different story here and they can all be shared over delicious food on any corner of the city.”

Isaiah

Isaiah Haley

Isaiah

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“The Santa Cruz River is one of the few most hospitable places in the Sonoran desert.”

YAC – Gianna

Gianna Alvarenga

YAC – Gianna

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“I would describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert as being an ecosystem that looks inhabitable and dead, but actually holds a lot of special value because of the many animals that live there and find food from it.”

IMG_1954

Paloma Martinez

IMG_1954

How would YOU describe the Santa Cruz River Valley and Sonoran Desert to someone who has never heard of the place?

“I would warn them and say that at first glance, it might be underwhelming or misjudged. Mostly because of the trash, and because many people expect a “river” to have water flowing. However, I would tell them they better love it because that river has been a big part of my life. It is also the reason Tucson even exists. I would tell them it is one way that animals like the coyote and javelina are able to travel more safely. I would tell them it’s a great place for horseback riding and sand ball wars. I would probably tell them the significance for past generations as well. Some Grandparents in Tucson still remember having boat parties on the river and hanging out after school.”